theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

(via npr)

philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Josef Albers (1888–1976). Not only a renowned artist, Albers also taught at the Bauhaus from 1922 to 1933 alongside artists like Paul Klee and Vasily Kandinsky. Albers developed basic compositions in order to explore color and tonal relationships, and his series, “Homage to the Square (It Seems),” comprises more than a thousand paintings, drawings, prints, and tapestries created over the course of three decades. See this intriguing painting in gallery 180 on the first floor. See more work by Albers here.


Homage to the Square (It Seems),” 1963, by Josef Albers (© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

newyorker:

What distinguishes a selfie from an artist’s self-portrait? Look through a selection of photographs: http://nyr.kr/1hzvpEZ

Above: Jun Ahn, “Self-Portrait” (2008)/Courtesy Christophe Guye Galerie, Zürich

timelightbox:

Photographs by Costică Acsinte—Courtesy of Costică Acsinte Archive/Flickr

A Romanian WWI photographer’s 5000 unseen glass plate portraits — beautifully surreal and rapidly deteriorating — are entirely in the Public Domain and finally being digitized 30 years after his death.

Read more on LightBox.

life:


Should photojournalists ever manipulate an image? This enduring picture of medical missionary Albert Schweitzer, taken by the great W. Eugene Smith, is actually a combination of two separate negatives.  (Photo: W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Should photojournalists ever manipulate an image? This enduring picture of medical missionary Albert Schweitzer, taken by the great W. Eugene Smith, is actually a combination of two separate negatives.

(Photo: W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

thegetty:

Happy National Parks Day! 

Here are a few 19th-century photographs of California’s Yosemite National Park by Carleton Watkins. His photographs helped to establish Yosemite as a protected national park in 1864.

Grizzly Giant Mariposa Grove - 33 ft. Diam, 1861, Carleton Watkins. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Piwayac - Sentinel (View of the Valley) 3270 ft., 1861, Carleton Watkins. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Tutucanula - El Capitan 3600 ft. Yosemite, 1861, Carleton Watkins. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Section of Grizzly Giant, Mariposa Grove, 1861, Carleton Watkins. J. Paul Getty Museum.

filterphoto:

All Photographs from the series Pigeon Hill: Then & Now by Jeffery Wolin

Jeffery Wolin's art is an exploration of memory. Pigeon Hill: Then & Now is made up of diptychs, photographs Wolin made over 20 years ago set alongside images of the same subjects today. Wolin asks his subjects to recall the day the original photograph was taken, an image from a lifetime ago. You can see Wolin’s work, along with work from Lisa Wiltse's The Charcoal Kids of Ulingan at the Catherine Edelman Gallery on January 10.

Jeffery Wolin
Pigeon Hill: Then & Now
January 10 - March 1
Reception: January 10, 5:30 - 8 PM
Catherine Edelman Gallery
300 West Superior St
Chicago, IL

artnet:

New York at night: It’s impossible to tire of a view such as this one, courtesy of Berenice Abbott.